There are actually two pulp mills on the harbourside in the Finnish city of Rauma. One is a UPM mill that only makes mechanical pulp (a little like Boyer Mill), the other is owned by Botnia: employer of Timo Piilonen, and is a bleached kraft mill of about 50% Gunns’ proposed capacity.

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You can see more photos of it and other details at:

http://www.botnia.com/AboutBotnia/ProductionUnits/Pages/raumamill.aspx

Interestingly, Botnia’s Rauma mill started making TCF bleached kraft pulp when it started up in 1996 and then changed over to ECF in 2007 - presumably because the cost is lower and the premium paid for TCF paper in Germany disappeared at about that time.

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The thing about MPs’ visits to mills (like Peter Gutwein’s, pic above) is that when mill owners have advance warning of a visit from one of Poyry’s customers, they are quite happy to turn production down for the day, so that the mill has minimal odour during the visit.

Finns are very good at cooperating in order to sell Finnish technology to the world.

They are called ‘the blond arabs’ for a reason!

You will also see that the geography of Rauma is very different to the Tamar - very flat with no place for the air to stagnate, or inversion layers to form. Probably constant sea breezes and wind off the Baltic Sea also helps. The photo that shows both pulp mills (kraft mill is the one in the centre) and a chemical factory (far left) in the context of the town of Rauma - do you really want twice as much steam as that rolling up and down the East Tamar Highway on a foggy winters morning?

Finally, here is a quote from a blog posted by a young American lady who lived in Rauma when she was 16:

‘Wood processing is core to the Finnish economy, and Rauma has a large pulp mill.  The smell of timber processing and wood pulp permeated everything in the area, and when I smell something similar now, it reminds me of saunas and nature and snow.’

July 19, 2007 in d) rauma, finland | Permalink | Comments (0)

Possibly this young lady was like Don Wing MLC and genetically unable to smell methyl mercaptan.  I suspect the tourism operators and vineyard owners in the Tamar would have quite a different view of the smell of wood pulp.

The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.
- John Kenneth Galbraith

Gunns sliding Share Price, HERE

Download transcript from last weeks Leg Co hearing into FT Finances:
110523_Forestry_Tas_Financial_Performance_Inquiry.pdf