Books

A Menapausal Mona-ment!

Paula Xiberras
02.09.14 7:23 am

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Some time ago I had the chance to talk to the wonderful Jean Kittson as she was on her way to a book signing for her latest book ‘Still Hot to Me’, an informative and mostly light hearted or should that be ‘heated’ look (’ botox is make up for under the skin’) at menopause.

Jean has strong connections to Tasmania with her ‘best friend in the world’, with whom she travelled the world, eventually set up home in Tasmania for five years and Jean remembers well, her visits to West Hobart during that time.

Jean says she still visits Tasmania at least 2 or 3 times a year and most recently was here in January speaking to Ophthalmologists as part of her role as spokesman for muscular degeneration, an issue close to her heart as her Mum has the condition. Jean is concerned with seeing and vision in a wider sense in that her aim is to help us see and clarify many issues, including in her recent book , helping men and women(to know themselves) and be aware of and how to manage their fertility and menopause .

Jean is keen to visit MONA and with its commitment to representations of bodily functions as Jean and I muse, there might be the opportunity to have a model of the female reproduction system installed there as Jean believes most people, especially women themselves, are ignorant of its appearance and tells me how she herself was surprised to know it is a ‘very vacuum packed area’. Perhaps no surprise there as a lot of women would vouch for ‘packing’ a lot of vacuuming into their lives!

Jean in fact, packs her book with many interesting facts such as ‘oestres’ affecting all parts of the body, even the eyes, evidenced by a symptom of menopause being dry eyes.

Jean’s conclusion is, in spite of all the modern technology and the help with and extensions of fertility it offers, there is ‘still the sobering thought that all are captive’ of this particular ‘biological trap’, that fertility, is ultimately finite and that’ mother nature’ is ‘old fashioned’ and hasn’t really kept up with the liberation of modern women or the advances of modern technology.

‘Still Hot to Me’ is out now, published by Pan Macmillan.

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Hobart Bookshop: A Compulsion to Kill

The Hobart Bookshop
01.09.14 11:56 am

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The Hobart Bookshop is pleased to invite you
to the launch, by Rob Valentine,
of Robert Cox’s new book

A Compulsion to Kill.

Where: The Hobart Bookshop
When: 5.30pm, Thursday September 18

Free event, all welcome.

A Compulsion to Kill is a dramatic chronological account of 19th-century Tasmanian serial murderers.
Never before revealed in such depth, the story is the culmination of extensive research and adept craftsmanship as it probes the essence of both the crimes and the killers themselves.

The Hobart Bookshop
22 Salamanca Square
Hobart Tasmania 7000
ph 03 6223 1803 | fax 03 6223 1804
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
http://www.hobartbookshop.com.au

What the Publisher says:

Anyone who thinks serial killing began with Jack the Ripper in England in 1888 will be shocked by the revelations in a new book.

Titled A Compulsion to Kill: The Surprising Story of Australia’s Earliest Serial Killers, it records seven cases of serial murder between 1807 and 1862, with a total of 33 victims.

Surprisingly, all the killings took place in sparsely populated Tasmania.

A Compulsion to Kill is the work of Hobart writer Robert Cox, author of two other books of Australian history and three collections of short stories.

“I’d written about a forgotten serial killer, Charles Routley, in a previous book,” Cox said, “and that piqued my curiosity about whether there were others.

“I started to look into it and was astonished at what I discovered— six other instances, all by escaped or former convicts.”

The first of them — and the first in Australia — were carried out in 1807 by little-known runaways named John Brown and Richard Lemon.

They killed three soldiers near Launceston and went on to kill a fellow fugitive and at least one Aborigine.

Better known was Alexander Pearce, the notorious cannibal convict.

He escaped from Macquarie Harbour penal settlement with seven others, but he was the sole survivor of the hazardous 150km trek to freedom.

Two of the escapees died of exhaustion, but all Pearce’s other companions were murdered and eaten.

Later, during a second escape from Macquarie Harbour, he butchered and consumed another runaway.

Emulating Pearce a few years later, a pair of convicts named Edward Broughton and Matthew McAvoy murdered and ate the flesh of three fellow fugitives from Macquarie Harbour.

Their particularly noisome contemporary Thomas Jeffrey (sometimes called Jeffries) was known as “The Monster”.

He was a rapist, sadist, cannibal and baby-killer.

After absconding with three others in December 1825, he was a party to five murders during a 40-day reign of terror.

His victims included of a five-month-old boy.

Shortly before his execution, he also confessed to being involved in a murder in England and two in NSW.

Another slayer of five men was the Irish convict John “Rocky” Whelan, who killed all his victims during a 24-day rampage in 1855.

The final chapter of A Compulsion to Kill is devoted to the Parkmount murders, a still-unsolved triple slaying in northern Tasmania in 1862.

Cox said the crime fascinates him because police twice had the likely killers, John Parker and Robert Sharman, in custody.

They were sent for trial both times but their trials were abandoned for lack of evidence, and no one was ever punished for the killings.

“Really, there was plenty of evidence pointing to their guilt,” Cox said, “especially their conflicting and frequently changing stories about where they were at the time of the murders.

“Better police work would have secured convictions, I think.”

A Compulsion to Kill, published by IP (Interactive Publications) under its Glass House Books imprint, is available in bookshops now.

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Deb Hunt-ing for Love and Non-Fictional Flying

Paula Xiberras
01.09.14 6:46 am

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In Shakespeare’s ‘Much Ado about Nothing’ his heroine Beatrice says:

‘You have stayed me in a happy hour I was about to protest I loved you and I love you with so much of my heart that none is left to protest’.

Deb hunt once played Beatrice in her ‘Shakespeare in the Park’ days when she lived in the UK. Deb also played many other Shakespearean heroines, such as Nerissa in ‘Merchant of Venice’ and Portia in ‘Julius Caesar’ before becoming her very own heroine in her own romance. As well as Shakespearean actor Deb has also forged careers as an events manager and as an English language teacher in Spain.

In addition to her busy and diverse work life Deb was hunting for a fantasy love for so long that when real love finally found her she did protest it, but like Beatrice came to realise her heart had nothing else to protest. For Deb it was a happy ending after pursuing an ideal notion of romance she instead was pursued by an ideal man, who won her by persistence.

Some time ago I called the wonderful Deb at her home but was greeted by her charming partner, the ‘love’ in her novel ‘Love in the Outback’.  I had missed Deb because, as she later told me, she was on her way to another appointment and was relaxing on a park bench with her morning cup of coffee when she was hit on the head with a football, completely unruffled she tells me the primary school children were very apologetic. This incident demonstrates Deb’s demeanour, unfazed by such hiccups and her adaptability, the major one being her settling on the other side of the world and in a demanding job with The Flying Doctors but she was inspired by people she met during her work, who had to overcome so much more such as natural disasters to rebuild their lives.

As part of working for The Flying Doctors Deb visited Tasmania and tells me she loves it here, intrigued by MONA, and most recently visiting Tassie to interview a lady farmer in the Meander Valley for a new book on Australian farmers.

Deb’s own book came about by chance when she was pitching a biography she was writing about someone else but after meeting with publishers was encouraged instead to write her own book because it was thought her story would resonate with readers.

Deb once called herself a ‘sinister stalking spinster’, a nod to her pursuit of unrequited love. Deb puts this down to growing up on fairy tales that promised happy ever after and being encouraged to continue to pursue the fairy-tale. Disenchanted with enchantment Deb decided to take up a job opportunity in Australia with The Flying Doctors. Metaphorically the job did some ‘doctoring’ on Deb, she healed and it gave her wings to fly both literally and metaphorically! The subsequent finding of love and relenting to it was the best decision she ever made and now she feels’ happy, settled and blessed’.

A resurgence has overtaken Deb with many ideas for future books including a children’s one that she started many years ago and would like to revisit are burgeoning.  There is also a desire to do a master’s degree in creative writing and make a return to journalism.

Now she and her partner are retired from their Flying Doctors work, Deb is a full time writer and there is time to take that trip to Jervis Bay with her partner and their beloved dog Maggie..

Deb’s book ‘love in the Outback’ is out now published by Pan Macmillan.

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Franchesca S-Mart-inez

Paula Xiberras
30.08.14 6:50 am

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The meaning of the name Francesca is ‘free’ and the Martinez name is derived from ‘Martinus’ which in turn derives from ’Mars’ the god of war, even though Francesca is very much a peace lover, she fights for values she believes in, such as freedom to find fulfilment outside of societies expectations. I was delighted to be given the opportunity to recently talk with this wonderful and talented young woman from her home in Britain.  A freedom from fulfilling societal expectations is very much a trademark of the beautiful Francesca Martinez, stand-up comedian, author and actor.

Although she is English born, Francesca is very multicultural. Francesca’s paternal grandparents are from Spain and there are Swedish links on her mum’s side, ironically, her mum also speaks fluent Spanish! Francesca also has links to Australia and, more importantly to Tasmania, in that her uncle formerly living in Perth has retired to the natural scenery of Hobart with ‘a home’, as Francesca so poetically puts it ‘licking the sea’.

Francesca is indeed no stranger to Australia herself, having completed 3 successive visits in 2010, 2011 and 2012. Francesca tells me she may tour again next year.

A self-confessed sun junky, when I spoke to Francesca she was just back from a sunny, hot two months in Gibraltar to have a ‘lovely’ escape from the British winter.

Francesca’s autobiography ‘what the **** is normal? ‘Discusses being born with Cerebral Palsy and her favoured name for it, ‘wobbly’ and how she is working on a world ‘wobbly revolution’.

Francesca’s is a beautiful autobiography that talks lovingly of family, the food prepared by her grandmother and her love of Spain, a place she hopes to eventually (many years in the future) retire to. Indeed, Francesca says one of the best things for her about the book is celebrating very publically her grandparents to the extent they have become well known like’ movie stars’ and ‘mythic figures’. She is happy to have had the chance to immortalise these very special people in literature.

Francesca’s main job may be comedy but she is also an experienced actor, starting her career in the children’s program Grange Hill. Francesca has never given up acting but ‘doesn’t wait by the phone’. She has on her wish list, a sitcom while she continues her career in stand-up. She says of stand-up although its daunting for some (everyone has talents they are naturally good at) and being a comedian, true to her name meaning ‘gives her a sense of ‘freedom’ she appreciates having no boss and not a’ 9 to 5 job in an office where you are staring at a lap top all day’.

Her parents supported her in pursuing her passion and following her dream, instead of encouraging her to find fulfilment in a job that provided money and security such as becoming a lawyer, which might cause one to ‘burn out in a few years’.

And this is all part of Francesca’s ‘wobbly revolution’, to do away with what society and culture perpetuates as who we should be and what we should want and aspire to. A young man called Dylan helped Francesca realise being confident and feeling beautiful comes from doing positive things and being happy with what you have rather than pine for what you haven’t got.

Francesca says to’ encourage passion’ and appreciate what we have, rather than have an ‘obsession’ over what we perceive we lack. Francesca gets angry about wasting any day with negative thoughts and would’ rather shift the perception’ in ‘gratitude for what we do have’.

Francesca’s book ‘what the **** is normal?’ is out now published by Random House.

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Hobart Bookshop: Leigh Swinbourne’s Away

The Hobart Bookshop
27.08.14 7:59 am

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The Hobart Bookshop and Ginninderra Press
are pleased to invite you to the launch of
Leigh Swinbourne’s

Away and Other Stories.

Where: The Hobart Bookshop
When: 5.30pm, Thursday September 11

All welcome to this free event.

The Hobart Bookshop
22 Salamanca Square
Hobart Tasmania 7000
ph 03 6223 1803 | fax 03 6223 1804
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
http://www.hobartbookshop.com.au

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New fiction book explores the unique relationship between twins

Scott Eathorne Quikmark Media W: http://www.quikmarkmedia.com.au
26.08.14 3:13 pm

Shane Willing has an identical twin brother, Barry. But why is it that Barry’s life is not dogged by the same crippling misfortune as his twin’s? Dual Carriageway (Sid Harta, 15 October, $24.95), is a fictional study of the unique relationships between twins – the implicit awareness, the shared chemistry and the peculiar differences.

Separated by distance but sharing similar goals at work and at play, the off-duty hours of the brothers are spiced up in humorous and saucy situations which pepper the novel. But when a twist of fate simultaneously steps into both their lives does it set in motion the possibility of a new start- or is it déjà vu?

Written by Melbourne author John Considine, Dual Carriageway is a fascinating and often very funny exploration of sibling struggles and relationship reversals where all is not what it appears to be.

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Science meets philosophy meets the humanities

Tasmanian Writers' Centre
21.08.14 6:57 am

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THE LARGER CONVERSATION
This Sunday August 24
Science meets philosophy meets the humanities.

GALLERY TEN - 71 Murray St, Hobart. Chaired by UTas Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Jeff Malpas…

Whose City? Sunday 24 August 2pm
Leigh Woolley - Architect
and Brian Risby - Urban Planner and policy advisor
Leigh Woolley is an Architect with over thirty years experience as an architectural and urban design practitioner, author and photographer. He is the recipient of numerous professional design awards across these disciplines.  He is a Churchill Fellow and an Adjunct Professor in the School of Architecture and Design UTAS. He practices from Hobart.

Brian Risby is one of Tasmania’s leading town planners, is the Director of Policy at the Tasmanian Planning Commission but is currently seconded to advise the Government and the Tasmanian Planning Reform Taskforce.  Brian holds a Masters Degree in Town Planning from the University of Tasmania and has many years of experience as a consultant planner and as a policy adviser to the State Government. He has held executive positions at both state and national levels with the Planning Institute of Australia.

Entry $5. TWC Members and full-time students free. Refreshments available

CHILDRENS BOOK WEEK 16-22 August ...

Read more about the Tasmanian Writers’ Centre activities here

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Lola’s new cousin ... a review

Thomas Connelly http://bogong-moth.blogspot.com/
19.08.14 7:26 am

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Some people find breast feeding confronting, but what happens when the baby gets hungry? She drinks her mum’s milk of course. I went to the Aboriginal Centre in Risdon Cove on National Aboriginal and Islander children’s day, as part of World Breastfeeding Week, to the launch of the children’s book, Lola’s New Cousin, written by Luana Towney.

This book is more than a simple children’s book. Sometimes, a teacher once told me, you will hit a wall, the only way around this wall will be a book. Lola’s New Cousin is such a book, adding to our communal toolkit. In her work with aboriginal mums Luana noticed that the decision to breast feed or not depended on the support, and ideas of those around the expectant mother.

In communities and families where breast feeding was frowned upon, for whatever reason, new mums would be hesitant to breast feed their babies. Conversely when breast feeding was embraced by the local community it was relatively easy for women to chose to attempt to breast feed.

Breast feeding may be natural, but for many women it is not intuitive. Successful breast feeding requires a supportive infrastructure to support the mother and child.

Seeing the general lack of education about breast feeding, in particular the lack of family friendly education, Luana Towney did not sit back discussing the problem, but rather used her formidable skills and experience to create a delightful children’s book.

Visiting her new cousin, Lola a curious preschooler, sees her aunty feed baby. “Lola has a little giggle. She can see how much baby likes her mummy’s milk.” This simple domestic activity is given the power of the written word, making it a strong lesson for the little ones.

The illustrations by Rosemary Mastnak are whimsical and gentle, capturing the warm, snug world of maternal love and nurturing. Well laid out with a readable font this book would be ideal for reading aloud to younger children, as well as entertaining and challenging emerging readers.

This gentle, sweet, slice of domestic life cleverly hides the fact that this book is, in fact, a weapon in the fight for better outcomes for children; subtly showing the crucial link between breastfeeding and newborn survival and health.

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Books | Review

Tansportation Islands and Cities: Tasmanian writers announced

Tansportation Islands and Cities
15.08.14 11:39 am

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The Hobart Bookshop: Launch, by Yvette Watt, of Carol Freeman’s new book, Paper Tiger…

The Hobart Bookshop
14.08.14 6:52 pm

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The Hobart Bookshop and Forty South Publishing are pleased to invite you to the launch, by Yvette Watt, of Carol Freeman’s new book, Paper Tiger: How Pictures Shaped the Thylacine.

When: 5.30pm, Thursday 28th August
Where: The Hobart Bookshop

Free event, all welcome.

Paper Tiger is an exciting new history of the thylacine that takes the reader on a journey behind artists’ brushstrokes and photographers’ lenses into the world of science, printing processes, publishing entrepreneurs, circulating libraries and bounties and reveals how inaccurate published images were ... and how profoundly they affected attitudes toward living thylacines. Written with sensitivity and an eye for detail, Paper Tiger uncovers forgotten drawings and lost photographs from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, telling a story full of mystery and revelations. It demonstrates how pictures and words have a vital influence on a species’ survival. As the rate of extinctions escalates, we are also reminded that sympathetic pictures have the power to provide hope for endangered animals.

Carol Freeman is a writer and Adjunct Researcher at the University of Tasmania, where she was awarded a University Medal in 2000. Her work focuses on representations of extinct and threatened species, ethics in human-animal relations and visualisations of animals in popular culture and wildlife documentaries.

Yvette Watt is a lecturer in painting at the Tasmanian College of the Arts. She has a PhD in fine art, has held numerous solo exhibitions and is the recipient of a number of grants and awards. Her work is held in a many public and private collections including Parliament House, Canberra, Artbank and the Art Gallery of WA. She has an ongoing fascination with the relationships between humans and animals and has been actively involved in animal advocacy since the mid-1980s.

For more information on the book and author, visit Carol Freeman’s website.

The Hobart Bookshop
22 Salamanca Square
Hobart Tasmania 7000
ph 03 6223 1803 | fax 03 6223 1804
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
http://www.hobartbookshop.com.au

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Lark tonight: Forty South Short Story Anthology 2014

Chris Gallagher, Centre Director Tasmanian Writers' Centre http://www.tasmanianwriters.org
13.08.14 5:04 pm

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Whose Mountain, Whose River, Whose City?

Chris Gallagher, Centre Director Tasmanian Writers' Centre http://www.tasmanianwriters.org
13.08.14 3:04 pm

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New YA historical fiction book ‘Resisting the Enemy’

Scott Eathorne Quikmark Media W: http://www.quikmarkmedia.com.au
13.08.14 12:24 pm

The first YA novel from author Lorraine Campbell, Resisting the Enemy (Palmer Higgs, October, $24.95) follows the story of twelve year old Valli, from a fresh-faced schoolgirl in Australia, to a young woman living in German Occupied France.

Resisting the Enemy is a thrilling story of conflict, danger and passion, moving from the beaches of Australia, to the boulevards of pre-war Paris, through the German invasion and the dark years of the Occupation. It’s about the enduring bonds of friendship, and one young woman’s fight to resist oppression, no matter what the odds.

Meticulously researched by the author, Resisting the Enemy is the first in a two book series, and suitable for YA readers with an interest in world history.

Melbourne-based Author Lorraine Campbell has worked for decades as a Court Reporter with the Victorian Government Reporting Service, and has studied German and French for a number of years.

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Convict Lives at the George Town Female Factory

Elise Archer, Speaker of the House of Assembly
10.08.14 2:59 pm

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Today I was honoured to launch the fourth in a series of books about Tasmanian convict women, Convict Lives at the George Town Female Factory.

The book is a collection of stories about 31 female convicts who were incarcerated at the George Town Female Factory when the town was the main settlement in the north.

An estimated 14,000 convict women were transported to Van Diemen’s Land from the time of British settlement in 1803 until 1853 when convict transportation ended. 

During that time, five female factories were established across the state to house convict women who were pending assignment, awaiting childbirth or undergoing punishment.

They lived in abhorrent conditions, with poor hygiene, inadequate nutrition, and in overcrowded accommodation.

The George Town Female Factory, which operated between 1822 and 1834, is arguably the lesser known of Tasmania’s five female houses of correction, but this meticulously researched book will help to rectify that.

The 26 authors have done a commendable job capturing Tasmania’s rich convict history and ensuring the stories of our founding mothers are passed on to future generations.

I congratulate the book’s editor, Dr Alison Alexander (above), the Female Convicts Research Centre Inc. and Convict Women’s Press Inc. for this intriguing insight into Tasmania’s colonial heritage.

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Friends Meeting House, 2pm Sun 14 Sept: James Boyce in conversation with James Charlton

Bloomsbury Publishing
09.08.14 3:34 pm

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Books | What's On

Hobart Bookshop: Launch of Michael Tatlow’s new book, Pike’s Pyramid

The Hobart Bookshop
08.08.14 7:05 am

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Please join us at the following event.

Book launch of Michael Tatlow’s new book, Pike’s Pyramid.
The Hobart Bookshop
Thursday August 21, 5.45pm

Free event, all welcome.

The Hobart Bookshop
22 Salamanca Square
Hobart Tasmania 7000
ph 03 6223 1803 | fax 03 6223 1804
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
http://www.hobartbookshop.com.au

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Books | What's On

My Vietnam War captures the danger of Vietnam, the mateship bonded under fire, and ...

Sharon Evans, Big Sky Publishing - Marketing & Communications, http://www.bigskypublishing.com.au
06.08.14 6:45 am

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... the crushing disappointment of returning to a country that despised them

Not all soldiers were lost on the battlefield, some struggled and fought their demons long after the Vietnam war was over, not all won ...

“Dave’s determination that ordinary Australians from all walks of life should understand the trauma of PTSD is not only the mark of true courage, it is a crucial step in our understanding of what is a national issue. We need more Dave Morgan’s and we need to listen to them and care for them — that right at the very least they have well and truly earned.” - Denny Neave, army brat, Vietnam veteran’s son, publisher

My Vietnam War, Scarred Forever by Dave Morgan (Big Sky Publishing, RRP $ 24.99) is a coming of age story about a self confessed ordinary bloke in a war that was anything but ordinary. When author Dave Morgan returned from Vietnam he was changed forever.  He turned 21 in Vietnam and he has lived with the legacy of this war for every year since then: not all soldiers were lost on the battlefield, some struggled and fought their demons long after the war was over - not all won.

As a young Signaller in Vietnam, Dave learnt to ‘survive to fight’ in an environment that varied from the mundane to terrifying.  This is his war, drawn from letters home, his secret diary entries, and the addition of seven powerful short stories from his fellow soldiers. Dave captures the danger these young men experienced in Vietnam, the mateship bonded under fire, and the crushing disappointment of returning to a nation where they were either ignored or vilified. They responded the only way they could: they suppressed the memories and stayed silent. 

The poignant reality is that many veterans felt they were alone, isolated, they struggled for decades before realising their nightmares where shared by others – for some it would be too late – suicide, alcoholism and cancer is a sad companion for many of our veterans. 

My Vietnam War is Dave’s story, but it is one that could be shared by almost 60,000 Australian soldiers. His wish is that current serving soldiers are not left to flounder with their mental war wounds as he and his veteran mates have been.  The post-war battlefield might be far from the war zone but the suffering and deaths post war are equally as sad and far reaching for the veterans, their families and friends.

Royalties from My Vietnam War will be donated to Soldier On, an organisation helping wounded warriors. 

My Vietnam War is Dave Morgan’s second book. His first book Ice Journey (Big Sky Publishing) captured Dave’s time on the ice where he finally came to grips with his PTSD.  Dave lives on the Sunshine Coast, QLD with his wife and continues to seek help for his PTSD.

Dave has moved forward from simply telling his own tale and now actively seeks to share his knowledge of the effects of PTSD with speaking events or veterans young and old and with schools, community groups and the medical profession. He is quietly embarking on an education program that has national potential.

About the Author

Dave Morgan is the real deal – he sincerely wants people to understand PTSD and the potential impact on not just Veterans of wars but also the soldiers current and from recent campaigns who could be dealing with this horrible mental disease.  In July 2014 Dave completed an 8 session research study program on PTSD with the Gallipoli Medical Research Foundation (GMRF), a world first, where researchers studied what triggered his PTSD and his reactions - triggering his fear and nightmares and compounding his own mental pain – in the search for understanding.

Dave is a wonderful bloke who isn’t afraid to say his PTSD made him ‘a bit of a mongrel’ to be around.. but we look at him now and see a hero, and his story really does break your heart for all those Vietnam vets left to feel like they did something wrong.

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Books

Paralympian Sam Bramham’s memoir shows ...

Scott Eathorne Quikmark Media W: http://www.quikmarkmedia.com.au
05.08.14 7:20 am

Paralympian Sam Bramham’s memoir shows what mischief Athletes really get up to when the crowds aren’t watching ...

It’s no secret that Paralympic gold medallist Sam Bramham enjoys a good prank. He made international headlines after telling an American journalist his prosthetic leg was chewed off by a kangaroo, and spent a night in jail after he and his mates faked a shark attack on a busy NSW beach. But there’s a lot more to Sam that his reputation as a prankster, including an Order of Australia medal for being an inspiration to Australian youth.

In the upcoming autobiography, Three-Quarter Man (Affirm Press, $29.99), Sam Bramham gives a candid and very funny account of life as an athlete, and lifts the lid in what mischief athletes really get up to when the crowds aren’t watching! From having his leg amputated at five, Sam shares his personal account of the highs and lows of the journey so far – including his current goal to win gold for Australia in the first ever 2016 Paralympic triathlon in Rio. Told with Sam’s unique sense of humour and his ‘never-say-die’ attitude, Three-Quarter Man is an inspiring insight into the mind of one of Australia’s most entertaining elite sportsmen.

Melbourne-based Sam Bramham is now available for interview. Sam won a clutch of swimming medals in the 2004 and 2008 Paralympics, and is currently training for the first ever Paralympic triathlon at the Rio Paralympics in 2016. He is an ambassador for Disability Sport and Recreation, Bully Free and Oz Child.

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Postcards from Bruny

The Tasmanian Writers' Centre
04.08.14 4:29 pm

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Books | Poetry | What's On

It’s about all of US

Isla MacGregor
04.08.14 5:00 am

She was her best friend - and found out she was exchanging drugs for sex
He is her father - he cried when she admitted to him she had been pack raped
She is her daughter - but her mother would not tell her how her face got so bruised
He is his old school mate - and could not understand why he was so depressed all the time
She was her neighbour - and was frightened by the screams coming nightly from the house
He was her brother - and was arrested and jailed for beating the man up who tortured her
She was the granddaughter - whose mother had committed suicide after 4 years at the brothel
He was his football team mate - and he hated listening to the bragging about the beatings
She was her sister - who watched her slowly becoming dehumanised
He was the husband - who lost his family and his children after the divorce
She was the wife - who found the phone number in his pocket and rang it
He was her flat mate - who had had helped her to bed so often at night, senseless and in pain
She was her mother - who, not knowing why, watched her daughter became more traumatised by the day
He was the ex fiancée - who regrets the bucks night party at the brothel over the Channel
She was her auntie - who warned her about the overseas work contract she signed before disappearing
He was the son - who listened as men raped his grandmother, mother and sister in the border village
She ................had endured for ten years degradation and violence in prostitution since she was fourteen -
she is a SURVIVOR and she wants you to know…....

“The punters sex trade spin ‘not about us without us’‘
Think again - it is about violence - it’s about all of US”

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Poetry

Launched in Launi: James Dryburgh’s Essays

Tim Thorne
04.08.14 4:00 am

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Launch Speech, James Dryburgh, Essays from Near and Far (Walleah Press, 2014)

Twenty years ago the Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery hosted an exhibition by John Wolseley which explored through the visual arts and botany the relationship between Tasmania and Patagonia.  James Dryburgh has given us a parallel comparison of these two regions of the former Gondwanaland, specifically of Tasmania with Tierra Del Fuego,  but in terms of social history. 

The wars mounted against the indigenous inhabitants, the influence of sealers and whalers, the use of convict labour, even the topography of Hobart and Ushuaia throw up similarities.  But the telling point which James makes, the point which really shafts the this essay, “Austral Reflections”, home to us is the huge difference between the celebration of indigenous culture on Tierra Del Fuego and its lack of visibility here.

I have started my speech with reference to this essay because it exemplifies, not just the geographical range of the collection, but James’s humanitarian concerns and his awareness of how far we have yet to go in order to achieve an equitable and compassionate society.

When I say “we”, I don’t just mean Tasmanians.  Those pieces in the book which are set in El Salvador and Bolivia might seem at a cursory glance to be of little relevance to readers on this cosy island, but they show, among other things, how determined people can be to regain liberty and dignity when those valuables have been ripped away from them.  Through James’s writing we can understand the ties that bind us to the virtual slaves working in the Potosi mines or to the survivors of the US sponsored massacres in Central America.  These ties are further emphasised by, for example, the story of Chico, who fled to Australia as a refugee from the terror in El Salvador and made a successful life in Melbourne, but returned to join the struggle for a better deal for his compatriots, or by “A Tale of Two Mines”, an account of James’s first-hand experiences underground in Potosi and Rosebery.

But the essay which first made me aware of James Dryburgh, the first time I read something of his and was struck sufficiently by it to remember the author’s name, was “Brighton’s Open Hand”, which I first came across in Island magazine a couple of years ago.  I was impressed by the way he took the found metaphor from a piece in the Tasmanian Mail in 1885 of “the Brighton district as an open hand” and built on it so that what was 130 years ago a cute observation on geomorphology became, through his writing, a telling symbol of compassion, woven into a powerful statement about its lack in the policies and strategies of our political leaders.  In fact, as the events laid out in this essay attest, such politicians as Senator Erich Abetz not only lack compassion but see compassion itself as the enemy.

The late great Hunter S Thomson claimed that he was the only journalist to ride with both Richard Nixon and the Hell’s Angels.  James Dryburgh is probably the only journalist to have interviewed both Ingrid Betancourt and Martin Lynch.  The inclusion of both these in the book shows another dimension of his talent.  It is a remarkable achievement to be able to present the experiences and the ideas of these two quite disparate people without intruding his own personality, yet at the same time to use his intelligence and insight so as to shape the interviewing process into a coherent and memorable work.  In a similar vein, he is certainly the only writer to have put two of my heroes, Emily Conolan and Oscar Romero, in adjacent essays, in the same book.  If you don’t know of either of these heroic people, shame on you, but that in itself should be incentive enough to read the book. 

I don’t intend to comment on every piece in the collection, but I can’t finish without assuring you, the prospective readers, that you will be just as captivated by the more personal essays, including the ones on the death of his friend Leon and on the birth of his son Santiago. 

I thoroughly recommend Essays from Near and Far to you.  I congratulate Walleah Press for bringing it out and, of course, James on creating it.  To quote Pete Hay in his Foreword, “These essays bring literature to the service of analysis and commentary.”  They do so because James Dryburgh is not only a man of insight, compassion and initiative but he is a writer with the skills necessary to penetrate into a reader’s heart.  And those skills are rare indeed.  Please don’t just take my word for this. Buy the book and discover it for yourself.  It is with great pleasure that I launch James Dryburgh’s Essays from Near and Far. 

Earlier, Launched in Hobart:  The Night I met Jimbo, Donzo fell UP the stairs ...

• Listen to James interviewed in ABC local radio by Ryk Goddard:
https://m.soundcloud.com/936-abc-hobart/the-silver-that-founded-europe

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Writers | James Dryburgh | Books

Celebrating the release of Born Bad ...

Imogen Kandel, Black Inc Books http://www.blackincbooks.com
02.08.14 10:16 am

image

A polite reminder email that the following events to celebrate the release of Born Bad: Original Sin and the Making of the Western World by James Boyce are taking place next week.

• Book Launch (Hobart) With Jo Flanagan, Thursday 7 August, 5:30pm, The Hobart Bookshop. No RSVP required.

Conversation Event (Launceston) With Nick Clements, Friday 8 August, 5:30pm, Fullers Bookshop. Please RSVP by Wednesday 6 August to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or (03) 9486 0288.

Download invitations below for more information. We look forward to seeing you there:
Born_Bad_launch_invite.pdf
Born_Bad_Fullers_event_invite.pdf

Born Bad
Original Sin and the Making of the Western World
James Boyce

A grand history of ideas in the tradition of Alain de Botton’s Religion for
Atheists and Simon Schama’s The Story of the Jews.

“The purpose of this book is not to defend or condemn the Western creation story,
but to challenge the assumption that its influence was ended by science and
secularism.” – James Boyce, Born Bad

How much of an influence does original sin have on our every-day lives?

Acclaimed author and historian James Boyce traces the origins and endurance
of original sin - from Adam and Eve, St Augustine and Martin Luther to Adam
Smith, Sigmund Freud and Richard Dawkins.

Original sin is based on the premise that humans are ‘born bad’ and only God’s
grace can bring salvation. Although Christianity is on the wane, Boyce explores
how these religious ideas of morality still underpin our modern society. Even in
these secular times, the creation story still grips our imaginations. If today the
specific doctrine has all but disappeared (even from the churches), what remains
is the distinctive discontent of Western people – the feelings of guilt and
inadequacy associated not with doing wrong, but with being wrong.

Not simply a book on religion, Born Bad is an analysis of western culture, the
modern human condition and our continuous search for the one thing that will
save us from ourselves.

image

James Boyce is the multi award-winning author of the
bestsellers 1835: The Founding of Melbourne and the
Conquest of Australia (2011) and Van Diemen’s Land: A
History (2008). He has a PhD from the University of
Tasmania, where he is an honorary research associate of the
School of Geography and Environmental Studies.

ISBN: 978-1-86395-676-5 • RRP $34.99
August 2014 Release • 256 pages

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Celebrating the release of Born Bad ...

Imogen Kandel, Black Inc Books http://www.blackincbooks.com
02.08.14 10:16 am

image

A polite reminder email that the following events to celebrate the release of Born Bad: Original Sin and the Making of the Western World by James Boyce are taking place next week.

• Book Launch (Hobart) With Jo Flanagan, Thursday 7 August, 5:30pm, The Hobart Bookshop. No RSVP required.

Conversation Event (Launceston) With Nick Clements, Friday 8 August, 5:30pm, Fullers Bookshop. Please RSVP by Wednesday 6 August to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or (03) 9486 0288.

Download invitations below for more information. We look forward to seeing you there:
Born_Bad_launch_invite.pdf
Born_Bad_Fullers_event_invite.pdf

Born Bad
Original Sin and the Making of the Western World
James Boyce

A grand history of ideas in the tradition of Alain de Botton’s Religion for
Atheists and Simon Schama’s The Story of the Jews.

“The purpose of this book is not to defend or condemn the Western creation story,
but to challenge the assumption that its influence was ended by science and
secularism.” – James Boyce, Born Bad

How much of an influence does original sin have on our every-day lives?

Acclaimed author and historian James Boyce traces the origins and endurance
of original sin - from Adam and Eve, St Augustine and Martin Luther to Adam
Smith, Sigmund Freud and Richard Dawkins.

Original sin is based on the premise that humans are ‘born bad’ and only God’s
grace can bring salvation. Although Christianity is on the wane, Boyce explores
how these religious ideas of morality still underpin our modern society. Even in
these secular times, the creation story still grips our imaginations. If today the
specific doctrine has all but disappeared (even from the churches), what remains
is the distinctive discontent of Western people – the feelings of guilt and
inadequacy associated not with doing wrong, but with being wrong.

Not simply a book on religion, Born Bad is an analysis of western culture, the
modern human condition and our continuous search for the one thing that will
save us from ourselves.

image

James Boyce is the multi award-winning author of the
bestsellers 1835: The Founding of Melbourne and the
Conquest of Australia (2011) and Van Diemen’s Land: A
History (2008). He has a PhD from the University of
Tasmania, where he is an honorary research associate of the
School of Geography and Environmental Studies.

ISBN: 978-1-86395-676-5 • RRP $34.99
August 2014 Release • 256 pages

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Senator John McCain on Twitter

John McCain on Twitter
31.07.14 12:45 pm

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I highly recommend Richard Flanagan’s “The Narrow Road To The Deep North” - a remarkable book:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Narrow-Road-Deep-North-ebook/dp/B00DBOF5Q6

https://twitter.com/senjohnmccain/status/494117740807200768?refsrc=email

Posted by Senator John McCain on Twitter on 30/07/14 at 08:49 AM

EARLIER on Tasmanian Times:

Richard Flanagan lone Aussie on Booker longlist

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Aussie woman travels to 22 countries to go on 75 blind dates ...

Scott Eathorne Quikmark Media http://www.quikmarkmedia.com.au
31.07.14 12:24 pm

... writes about cultural differences of dating in new travel memoir

22 countries, 81 days, 294 meals and 75 blind-dates – that’s the itinerary for Bambi Smyth’s international search for love in the new travel memoir, Men on the Menu (The Five Mile Press, $32.95, October 2014).

Not having much luck dating Australian men, Bambi decides it’s time to expand her dating horizon, and sets off on an international journey across the globe to 22 countries across 6 continents. In just 81 days she manages to arrange dates with 75 men aged 21-61, including an Italian prince, a Spanish gigolo, a Russian billionaire, and a priest at the Vatican. She even matches up each date with a dish specific to their culture e.g. “Stefano from Italy was a doppio espresso coffee, because he was hot, dark, steamy, and gave me heart palpitations.”

Combining her three greatest passions – food, travel and men, Bambi shares all of her most intimate travel and dating experiences, providing an insight into the cultural differences of dating and ultimately changing her perception of men – and herself – forever. Hilarious, sincere and addictive reading, Men on the Menu is an inspiring travel memoir for anyone looking to take a chance on love.

Melbourne-based author Bambi Smyth spent her first sixteen years being dragged around the world by her naval officer father and caught the bug for adventure, travelling to over 38 countries, and seeking out-of-the-way destinations. Bambi has had a successful career as an illustrator and children’s book author, and recently turned her attention to more adult themes of Travel, Food, and Men. She currently has no husband, or children, but is thinking of adopting a three-legged dog.

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Essays from Near and Far - Northern Launch

Editor
29.07.14 5:09 am

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Great poet, great man, Tim Thorne, will be launching James Dryburgh’s Essays from Near and Far in the north at Petrarch’s Bookshop, 89 Brisbane Street, Launceston, Friday 1st August at 6pm. ALL WELCOME!

In Essays from Near and Far, James Dryburgh manages to contextualise and illuminate the human condition. From South America to Tasmania his collection of essays reveal the motivations and beliefs of those who struggle against economic, historical and political injustices. He also succeeds in articulating his own soul and the reasons why he is drawn to the subjects explored. A great collection by an author not afraid to immerse himself and, quite literally, get his hands dirty in pursuit of the essential story in the tradition of the finest literary non-fiction.

John Martinkus, Journalist, Author and Academic.

And if for some sad reason you cannot make it, you can make the book magically arrive in your hands for $20 and free postage, simply by clicking HERE:

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Books | What's On

The new novel from acclaimed author Robert Hollingworth

Scott Eathorne Quikmark Media W: http://www.quikmarkmedia.com.au
28.07.14 1:03 pm

Forthcoming novel follows a young boy orphaned after a bushfire, examines divide between nature and culture .

Orphaned after a bushfire, eleven-year-old Shaun must now go to live with his aunt in the city. Here his world of benign nature meets the urban frontline head on. What can city life teach him, what can he offer the many troubled people he meets there?

The new novel from acclaimed author Robert Hollingworth, The Colour of the Night (Hybrid Publishing, October, $24.95), centres on the increasing divide between nature and culture. During this era of great technological advancement, one question looms large: Do we lose anything if we leave the green world behind? This is a story of polarities: the country and the city; nature and culture; the material and the digital; the spirit and the flesh; lost faith and renewed hope. The Colour of the Night is a tale of compelling human insight.

Robert Hollingworth is a successful and talented visual artist as well as a respected writer. Hollingworth’s literary works include his memoir, Nature Boy, and They Called Me the Wildman: The Prison Diary of Henricke Nelsen, which was shortlisted for the SA Premier’s Literary Awards Fiction prize in 2010 and, since 2009, has been included on both the Victorian and NSW Premier’s Reading Challenge List. Robert Hollingworth’s last work of fiction was Smythe’s Theory of Everything.

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Death in a Garden

Christopher Nagle. writing.com
28.07.14 3:56 am

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Context ...

Softwell is a life restoration company that rebuilds existential capital and social maintenance infrastructure.

One of its founding fathers has fallen foul of the corporate politics that is taking over and remolding its inspirational and charismatic origins.  He is removed in some disgrace, which not only breaks his heart, but his health and will to live.  Death takes him, but in so doing reveals all that life never understood.  And the new leader will beatify his memory….

‘Death in the Afternoon’ is a poem about ideals, virtue, power, memory, betrayal, death and the fallibility of all things, no matter how well intended and organized.

Life is messy.  Succession and change is inevitable.  Death resolves all.  Read on…

How could it come to this

that even crunching slippers

on gravelled path seemed loud

and full of fury

reminders

of that last and awful meeting

on floor fifty-two?


He needed the escape

through the welcome unshut portal

to his shed of kinder things

the reassuring smells

of garden scents

paint and solvents

the orderly and predictable rows

of tools to make and mend

in the quiet limpid light

of innocent afternoons

that filtered through the panes

of fly flecked cobwebbed windows

peeling paint

as mute remains of better days.


And yet in the shadows

of this tin room

was something so oppressive

in its silence,

so accusing

in its demeanor,

that he fidgeted

and couldn’t concentrate

except upon a looming dread

a dark and chilling draft

whose icy malice churned his heart.

 

He could feel the blood swelling

and pulsing round his temples

bringing on a migraine. 

He tried to massage them

then his nose’s bridge

to relieve the eye strain. 

But with eyes closed

there was no darkness

only harsh fluorescent lighting

in the heavy tabled board room

on the floor below his office

where there’s now a meeting

and water there for drinking

to slake the desert dryness

of his mouth now dehydrating

salty silence in the making

and cracking lips a-grinding

on a face that is composing

for a blow.


Read the full poem here, where you will also find the correct formatting ...

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Poetry

Griffith Review: The Way We Work

Susan Hornbeck
28.07.14 1:12 am

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A QUARTERLY OF NEW WRITING & IDEAS
The Way
We Work
Edited by JULIANNE SCHULTZ • Edition 45
PUBLISHED AUGUST 2014 • RRP $27.99 / NZ $35.00
The way we work has changed profoundly in recent
years.
Australians are now near the top of the list of working
hours in developed countries; a substantial and growing
proportion of people work part-time with multiple
employers – not all by choice; unpaid internships are
the normal entry path for young people; women are
no longer forced to resign when they marry or become
pregnant, but the wage gap remains; manufacturing and
agricultural jobs have given way to working in services,
and now those jobs that don’t actually demand hands on
contact are also moving offshore.
Many welcome the flexibility of the new environment.
For others, though, it represents a deepening of risk and
insecurity. The proletariat is giving way to what has been
called the precariat, a new class who lack the stability and
certainty of regular work or predictable social welfare.
Griffith REVIEW 45: The Way We Work explores the
extraordinary structural changes in work caused by
technology, globalisation, economic theory, the collapse
of the unions and an ageing population.
Featuring essays from Ashley Hay, Gideon Haigh, Mandy
Sayer, Rebecca Huntley, Peter Mares, Josephine Rowe
and more, The Way We Work asks: How does work shape
our values, our citizens, cultures and communities? As
our work changes, how will it change us? How does the
blurring of work and leisure through ‘access anywhere’
technology affect our attitudes to work? How are
older Australians going to find consistent and flexible
work (as the government wants them to do) when age
discrimination is rife? Will flexible work help decrease
the gender gap?
M E D I A R E L E A S E • g r i f f i t h re v i ew. c o m
UNDER EMBARGO UNTIL
23 JULY 2014
REVIEW COPIES/INTERVIEW
To request a review copy, or to arrange an
interview with one or more of the contributors,
please contact:
Susan Hornbeck
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) • 0434 01 30 80
Australia is not America, where millions struggle
to make ends meet with inadequate jobs and social
support, or one of those European countries where
unemployment rates have reached well into double
digits and remained there for years, or one of the many
countries where work itself may be life threatening.
But even here work is less secure and less predictable,
forcing us to adapt. We exist in professional landscapes
that didn’t exist fifteen years ago, that are still being
altered and transformed today, and that are probably
all but incomprehensible to our parents’ generation.
One thing remains constant though, work is essential
to economic wellbeing and meaning, so getting it
right is important.
Includes
FREE ebook
WHEN WE
WERE KINGS
The changing face
of journalism
• More and more Australian pensioners are cultivating
and/or selling illegal drugs to top-up their income, and
ensure regular visitors. MANDY SAYER’s father did
it, and she travels from Nimbin to the Gold Coast to
Sydney to meet other pensioners happily selling and
manufacturing drugs.
• Asylum seekers living in the community in Australia
are denied the right to work. PETER MARES argues
that to deny the right to work is to deny a fundamental
source of human dignity with impacts on physical and
mental health. The human and financial costs of such a
policy could be very great indeed.
• Malaysia is home to one of the largest refugee
populations in the Asia–Pacific. Anthropologist
GERHARD HOFFSTAEDTER discovers that much of
the Malaysian economy is facilitated by the influx of
illegal and undocumented workers who toil with little
or no protection. Work for them is an act of survival.
• Filmmaker ANDREW BELK works in the developing
world creating digital campaigns for child welfare. He
explains what resonates with the audience, Australian
Youth, and moves them to act through the lens of a trip
to Ethiopia.
• HAYLEY KATZEN examines the trade of domestic
workers from Hong Kong to Johannesburg and
differing cultural attitudes towards housecleaning and
a home of one’s own.
• LIZ TEMPLE shines new light on the debate of Australia’s
gendered wage gap and lack of females in executive
positions in a witty, thought-provoking and engaging
essay. Her sharp analysis tackles common myths
head on, while also offering well-argued critiques of
proposed solutions such as gender quotas.
• KRISTI MANSFIELD stresses the importance of female
entrepreneurship to Australia, the potential to go global
and the impact women are already making on the local
innovation and tech start-up culture.
• GILLIAN BOURAS, born of pioneer stock, reflects on
the differences between her own attitudes to work and
that of her mother-in-law, born and raised in rural
Greece where unremitting labour was the only way of
guaranteeing food and shelter.
CONTRIBUTORS
• In a broad-ranging essay, award-winning author
ASHLEY HAY explores the way species adapt or become
extinct, and looks at jobs that have become extinct. She
draws parallels with the insecurity that climate change
provokes and wonders at our ability to adapt to new
professional landscapes.
• GIDEON HAIGH examines the shift from blue collar
to white collar and service sector jobs and asks: How
does work shape our values, our citizens, cultures and
communities? As our work changes, how will it change
us?
The automotive industry did not simply make cars: it made
lives, by helping its workers build families, towns, suburbs and
networks of relations. – Gideon Haigh
• Freelance writer and editor VIRGINIA LLOYD
‘commutes’ from her bedroom in New York to her
clients in Australia via Skype. Despite the promise of
flexibility, she argues, freelance ‘knowledge economy’
workers are a powerless group, as well as a precarious
one.
• DAVID PEETZ explores the history of work in Australia
and argues that we, as a society, face choices that affect
what we do, the way we work, the nature of work, and
who benefits and who suffers from it. Our choices affect
millions of others.
One person’s flexibility is another person’s insecurity. The
mythology of the ‘portfolio’ career, as if somehow workers like
to be shunted from industry to industry over their lifetime,
hides the fact that workers are treated as more disposable than
before. – David Peetz
• Having too much to do in the home and a lack of
flexibility in the workplace are seen as key obstacles
to mothers maintaining fulfilling careers. And yet
REBECCA HUNTLEY discovers that casual ‘flexible’
jobs are slowly forcing women out of the middle class.
• Improved health and longevity means that more
people are looking for something to fill that 20 years
or so beyond what used to be ‘retirement age’. DARRYL
DYMOCK looks at the reasons people return to work
post-retirement, and discovers the very real problem of
age discrimination.
M E D I A R E L E A S E • g r i f f i t h re v i ew. c o m
‘Griffith REVIEW
is a cornucopia
of excellence’
The Australi an
MORE CONTRIBUTORS
• In a very funny memoir, DMETRI KAKMI recalls
working at the less-than-glamorous Hoyts Cinemas on
Bourke Street, Melbourne in the mid 1980s.
• We rarely consider the wellbeing and experiences of
doctors. Forced into rushed consultations by Medicare
and waiting room economics, LUCY MAYES’ moving
essay looks at the stress that doctors experience by being
unable to take ‘time to care’, leading to burnout and even
suicide.
• JULIE JAMES BAILEY reflects on the School of Air
near Alice Springs and the unbalanced education of
Aboriginal children in comparison to isolated white
children. She looks at the lack of appropriate literacy
programs in remote and indigenous communities.
• On the eve of another Australian tour, journalist and
music writer CRAIG McGREGOR recalls his up-down
relationship with Bob Dylan since 1966, and argues he is
the greatest songwriter since Homer.
• As snow blankets the Montreal cityscape outside her
window, JOSEPHINE ROWE explores her ongoing battle
with depression.
• With fiction by GREGORY DAY, PADDY O’REILLY,
ADAM NARNST, ELIZABETH WOODS and MELANIE
CHENG.
• With poetry by JUSTIN CLEMENS and JOHN
WATSON.
• Includes a free e-book When We Were Kings examining
the changing face of journalism featuring PHIL BROWN,
FRANK ROBSON, RACHEL BUCHANAN, SONYA
VOUMARD and KATHRYN KNIGHT.
• Online essays by TANVEER AHMED, RACHEL
FLYNN, FRANCES GUO, ANNEE LAWRENCE,
KATE McMURRAY, JENNY SINCLAIR and poetry by
DUNCAN RICHARDSON and LAURA JAN SHORE.
M E D I A R E L E A S E • g r i f f i t h re v i ew. c o m
ABOUT THE EDITOR
JULIANNE SCHULTZ AM FAHA is the founding editor of
Griffith REVIEW, the award-winning literary and public
affairs quarterly journal. Professor Schultz Chairs the
Australian Film Television and Radio School, is a member
of Australia Council for the Arts’ Pool of Peers and was
until recently a non-executive director of the boards of the
Australian Broadcasting Corporation and Grattan Institute.
Julianne is an acclaimed author, and in 2009 became a
Member of the Order of Australia for services to journalism
and the community
REVIEW COPIES/INTERVIEW
To request a review copy, or to arrange an
interview with one or more of the contributors,
please contact:
Susan Hornbeck
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) • 0434 01 30 80
UNDER EMBARGO UNTIL
23 JULY 2014
Includes
FREE ebook
WHEN WE
WERE KINGS
The changing face
of journalism

Read more

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Launched: The Songs of Jesse Adams

Paul Arnott
25.07.14 2:07 pm

image

Rock singer. Hard drinker, hard ‘player’. Friend of underworld figures, bikies and gays.

This is the image of an ‘Aussie Jesus’ presented to a capacity crowd who attended the launch of a new book that re-imagines the Jesus story in 1960’s Australia last night at Readings Bookshop in Carltom.  A spokesperson from Readings said it was “the biggest crowd they could remember for a book launch at the store”.

‘The Songs of Jesse Adams’ sets the familiar story into the streets of St.Kilda, Fitzroy and other inner city Melbourne settings. King’s Cross, at the height of its Sixties seediness and where the main character keeps a small flat above a tattoo parlour, also features heavily. The ‘Jesus’ figure, Jesse Adams, wades into controversy, destroying churches, invading Parliament and challenging the ANZAC myth in what develops into a pub brawl.

In launching the book, Tim Costello linked the contemporary Jesus figure to the World AIDS Conference currently underway in Melbourne and ongoing controversy about Australia’s handling of refugees.

“We are in danger of losing sight of the concept of human dignity and what it means to value the life of each human being,’ he said to the standing room only event. ‘This sense of dignity was novel back two thousand years ago when ‘the greatest story’ unfolded and comes through loud and clear in the person of Jesse Adams.”

Author Peter McKinnon, a former business executive and now full-time writer, said that the book was about “ what happens when someone says ‘yes’ to you when all the world is saying ‘no’ ... that what you believe changes things and changes you in the process.”

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