Books

New York Review of Books: Will Trump talk to Kim?

New York Review of Books
20.04.18 7:51 am

Read here

Read more

0 comments

London Review of Books: The End of the Epithet

London Review of Books
20.04.18 7:03 am

Read here

Read more

0 comments

New York Review of Books: The Revolution That Wasn’t

New York Review of Books
18.04.18 8:53 am

Read here

Read more

0 comments

Local author tells personal story to support family violence victims (book launch)

Alina Thomas, CEO SHE
16.04.18 1:39 pm

Deborah Thomson found the peaceful life she always wanted in Chasm Creek, on the North Coast of Tasmania, but it took her a long time to get there. Deborah Thomson has written a book about what happened when her life was changed irrevocably by an abusive partner, a relationship which she endured for 17 years.

Whose Life is it Anyway? Recognising and Surviving Domestic Violence published by Brolga Publishing, aims to support people being impacted by abusive partners. “I have written this book to help others in similar situations to leave early in their relationship, before they too suffer debilitating trauma,” stated Deborah Thomson author of the new book. “Since leaving I have come to realise how debilitating trauma is when associated with staying in a long-term violent partnership. Lived experience has shown me that such trauma can take half a lifetime to resolve,” explains Ms Thomson.

Alina Thomas, CEO of Family Violence service SHE, says that Deborah’s experience is not uncommon. “Trauma is an inevitable consequence of long term abusive relationships. We see hundreds of women, every year in Tasmania who are left with physical and emotional symptoms of trauma due to ongoing abuse in relationships.”

The courage of women who have survived Family Violence can give hope to other people experiencing family violence as well as be a source of inspiration to the broader community. Family Violence advocate Rosie Batty changed the way that Australia responded to family violence and our local advocates say there is still a lot that needs to happen. As Author Deb Thomson explains, “we need to do whatever we can to keep the issue of DV in the public’s vision while simultaneously supporting victims in whatever way possible”.

Alina Thomas believes there needs to be a greater investment in primary prevention and early intervention. “In Tasmania we are very focused on a tertiary response, what the police and the courts do after the violence has occurred. But if we are going to see a reduction in the family violence epidemic we need to be investing in programs that target the problem before it escalates to this point,” stated Ms Thomas.

Deborah Thomson’s book Whose life is it Anyway will be launched by Her Excellency Professor the Honourable Kate Warner AC at Fullers Bookshop on Wednesday 18th April at 5.30pm.

Read more

0 comments

New York Review of Books: Ai WeiWei on humanity

New York Review of Books
16.04.18 7:33 am

Read here

Read more

0 comments

London Review of Books: Christopher Hitchens

London Review of Books
13.04.18 8:10 am

Read here

Read more

0 comments

New York Review of Books: Black Pictures

New York Review of Books
13.04.18 6:28 am

Read here

Read more

0 comments

Forty South: Tasmanian Writers Prize 2018 Winners announced ...

Lucinda Sharp DIRECTOR, Forty South Publishing Pty Ltd
12.04.18 5:57 pm

Please see below for the winner and finalists for the Tasmanian Writers’ Prize 2018.

Once again we had entries from all round Australia and New Zealand and our judges, Robbie Arnott, James Dryburgh and Lian Tanner, have selected 10 stories for publication in the 2018 anthology.

The winning story “Boy”, by Melissa Manning, will appear in Issue 89 of Tasmania 40° South magazine (due out in mid-June) along with the complete list of winners. All finalists’ stories will be published in the Forty South Short Story Anthology 2018.

The anthology will be launched by Lian Tanner at the Tamar Valley Writers Festival, 14-16 September, 2018. The launch, on Saturday 15 September, 5.15pm, is a ticketed event but all finalists will be given free entry and invited to be part of a panel discussion.

Visit the festival website for to find out more about this fabulous festival - http://www.tamarvalleywritersfestival.com.au – I hope you can all attend.

Congratulations to the winner and finalists. Many thanks to all those who entered - your support is vital to the continuation of our competition and I encourage you to enter again in 2019.

Winner
Boy | Melissa Manning (VIC)

<i>Melissa is a writer of short and long form fiction. Her work has appeared in several publications, including Award Winning Australian Writing, Best Small Fictions (US), Overland, and The Big Issue. She won the 2015 Overland Story Wine Prize, and has placed or been shortlisted in other competitions, including the Overland VU Short Story Award and the Bath Flash Fiction Award. Her novel manuscripts have earned her support through the Varuna Residency Fellowship, and the ACT Writers’ Centre HARDCOPY program. She is currently working on a short story collection with the support of an ASA Emerging Writers’ Mentorship funded by the Copyright Agency Cultural Fund.

Highly commended
Hell’s Gate | Nicola Wardley (QLD)

Nicola who grew up in England, Hong Kong, Australia and Papua New Guinea, is a writer of short stories and fiction. She recently graduated from the University of Queensland’s Writing, Editing and Publishing program, which she found immensely valuable. Her short story The Lesson in the Lens appears in the Stringybark Press 2018 Malicious Mysteries anthology. She lives in Queensland and writes an occasional blog on https://www.nicolawardley.com/ 

Finalists
Bushfires | MJ Clark (SA)
Two Beach Chairs Facing the Sea | Keren Heenan (VIC)
Skelpers | Jennie Herrera (TAS)
The Horse | Ursula Horlock (TAS)
Lost | Margaret Hutchings (NSW)
Keeping Quiet | Allison Mitchell (TAS)
The Brough of Birsay | Arna Radovich (NSW)
Isle de Mort | Sarah White (TAS)

Forty South Publishing Pty Ltd

postal address: PO Box 168, Lindisfarne TAS 7015 |  office: 22A Maxwells Rd, Cambridge, Tasmania
telephone: 03 6243 1003 |  facsimile: 03 6243 1005
website: http://www.fortysouth.com.au  | facebook: http://www.facebook.com/fortysouth

Read more

0 comments

Tasmanian Writers Centre Makes Public Appeal

Prof Jeff Malpas Chair, TWC Committee of Management
11.04.18 3:17 pm

The Tasmanian Writers Centre announced today that it faces closure if it cannot generate interim funding to maintain its operations over the next 8 months.

The Chair of the Centre’s Board, Professor Jeff Malpas, said today that although some support had been forthcoming from Arts Tasmania, additional funding is urgently required to cover the Centre’s operational costs for the immediate future. Prof Malpas added that the Centre’s Board is of the belief that the Centre can flourish in the longer term, and has already embarked on a plan to reshape and reorient the Centre to engage more effectively with the Tasmanian reading and writing community.

The Board has a vibrant new Director-in-waiting, and is actively working to build partnerships with a range of organisations. “Although the Centre’s future is in jeopardy” said Prof Malpas “this is also an opportunity for the Centre to open up a wider conversation with the Tasmanian community about the importance of literature and literacy in Tasmania and to articulate a new vision for the role of the Centre, and its biennial Tasmanian Writers and Readers Festival, in the creative and literary life of the island”.

The Centre is hoping to generate enough short-term support from the Tasmanian community through philanthropic donations, crowd funding, and other sources, to enable it to continue into the beginning of 2019, when it expects to be financially viable once again.

Further information will be available soon at https://www.taswriters.org/.


About the Tasmanian Writers Centre ...

The Tasmanian Writers Centre (TWC) works as an advocacy, outreach and support service for Tasmania’s many aspiring, emerging and established writers. Its programs concentrate on the promotion of Tasmanian writers by engaging with a range of audiences, agents, publishers and projects.

The TWC is based year-round at the Salamanca Arts Centre in Hobart’s arts precinct. It is a small, but welcoming space for writers, readers, partners and visitors. Our program of events, workshops and the festival are held around the city and/or across the state - taking TWC services to regional Tasmania. Whether in its permanent home in the capital city or on the road, the TWC is the primary conduit in Tasmania that enables and supports writers, both in their efforts to connect with readers and establish their own artistic, professional and business development.

Read more

0 comments

Aurora House Publishing: The Milestone Incident

Aurora Publishing
09.04.18 7:42 pm

image

The Milestone Incident by Carl Lakeland is a powerful thriller that melds the elements of suspense and crime fiction to give readers a tremendous ride. Project Amber: The Milestone Incident is intelligently plotted, brilliantly imagined with compelling characters, and executed to a great and triumphant finish. You can’t stop reading until the very last page.
~ Romuald Dzemo for Readers’ Favorite

      Publication Date: 14th March 2018

  Title: Project Amber
          Author:  Carl Lakeland        

This book is exciting from beginning to end. Anything that I can say about the content could be a huge spoiler, so I’ll just say that this story it’s excellently written and it will keep you turning page after page because you’ll want to get to know what happens immediately. Definitely this author is one of the best exhibitors of the contemporary thriller.

Anamaría Aguirre Chourio
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
 
What if destiny set an unexpected path and everything changed?

Meet Angel. She’s clever, gutsy, and one savvy journalist who is always on the lookout for the next big story. Her life was going exactly as planned until she uncovered a plot that changed everything. Hidden away in the heart of Australia is a closely guarded secret known as Project Amber, and it has the ability to devastate the entire world. As Angel learns more about this sinister secret, she discovers that her stumbling across it was no accident. Every step she’s taken to that point was set out for her by those in the secret intelligence services, who’ve had a vested interest in her since she was a child.

Now Angel must decide if she has what it takes. If she is brave enough to face the truth of her life and fight the evil threating to destroy humanity. One thing is for sure though: Project Amber must be destroyed. The questions is, is Angel strong enough to do it?

Fast-paced and well-plotted, Project Amber is a suspenseful thriller that will have readers on the edge of their seats, dragging them through the Australian outback, the Simpson Desert, Pine Gap, Nurrungar, Alice Springs, Darwin, Adelaide, and Melbourne.

Project Amber is published by Aurora House. RRP AUD$24.95. ISBN 9780648226352

Read more

0 comments

Spinifex Press: AESOP THE FOX ... Suniti Namjoshi

Spinifex Press
06.04.18 12:58 pm

image

More here

Read more

0 comments

Tasmanian Writers Centre: April Events & Programs

Tasmanian Writers Centre
27.03.18 1:06 pm

Read here

Read more

0 comments

Hobart Bookshop: Launch of The Big Rort ...

Hobart Bookshop
27.03.18 12:49 pm

You are invited to the launch, by Jennifer Marshall, of Barry Weston’s new book, The Big Rort ...

image

Frank Cousins is the owner and sole employee of the Tasmanian Private Investigation Agency and, as his dear old mother said, ‘occasionally his own worst enemy’. Frank is hired by a London based solicitor to find the twin sister of his client in Hobart. It starts out as an easy-peasy, money for jam case that turns nasty. Then the lost love of his life calls upon him to assist her brother who looks like going down for the brutal murder of his pregnant partner. Of course, Frank takes on the case. But, as with most of Frank’s life, all is not what it first appears. Smuggled heroin, a handful of murders and coming face to face with Joe Shadii was not what Frank had anticipated in trying to win back his lost love.

The Big Rort is the second in the Tasmanian Private Investigation Agency series; the first, The Long Con, was published in 2017.

This is a free event and all are welcome.

Where: The Hobart Bookshop, 22 Salamanca Square
When: Wednesday April 4th, from 5.30pm

image

We are delighted to host the launch of Betty McKenzie-Tubb’s new collection of poetry, Word Fall.

‘Word Fall demonstrates Betty McKenzie-Tubb’s love and mastery of language in very accessible poems written in various styles. The book also reveals the poet’s wisdom, compassion and her wry, often self-deprecating sense of humour. The collection is arranged in three sections: Loss and Love, With Serious Intent and Froth and Bubble. I was moved to tears, deep contemplation or laughter as I read these poems that have arisen from a rich and well-lived life.’ - Robyn Mathison

‘The poems in Word Fall capture Betty McKenzie-Tubb’s refreshing and warm hearted style. In a voice both unafraid and elegant, she offers her wit and wisdom with open hands. Curiosity, understanding and insight are crafted into disciplined lines provoking laugher or deep reflections. We travel with the writer as she gleans and gathers stories from each facet of her round and ready life. This precious collection is both moving and uplifting.’ - Elizabeth Goodsir

This is a free event and all are welcome.

Where: The Hobart Bookshop, 22 Salamanca Square
When: Thursday April 12th, from 5.30pm

Read more

0 comments

New York Review of Books: Bang for the Buck

New York Review of Books
26.03.18 7:48 am

Read here

Read more

0 comments

Tim Flannery, New York Review of Books: Raised by Wolves

Tim Flannery, New York Review of Books
23.03.18 9:44 am

The realization that humans and dogs have been companions for at least 30,000 years has prompted a reconsideration not only of the relationships’ origins, but also of its consequences.

Read here

Read more

0 comments

New York Review of Books: Things that bother me ...

New York Review of Books
23.03.18 6:03 am

Read here

Read more

0 comments

London Review of Books: So many books ... so little time ...

London Review of Books
23.03.18 6:00 am

<strongRead here></strong>

Read more

0 comments

Sisters’ Stolen Songs

Paula Xiberras
23.03.18 5:24 am

image

At least once a year Dr Louise Allan makes a house call to see family in Tasmania. And it is family is the inspiration behind Louise’s debut novel ‘The Sisters’ Song’.

When I spoke to Louise she told me ‘The Sisters’ Song’ was a ‘good 6 years in the making’ and says the ‘first draft in 2010 was drivel’.

‘The Sisters’ Song’ is set in rural Tasmania, taking us on a journey from the 20’s to the 90s as it documents the very different lives of two sisters. The sisters are living an idyllic existence until their father passes away and their mother finds she cannot cope, releasing the girls to their grandmother’s care.  One sister, Nora is musically talented and her grandmother encourages her, to pursue a career in music. The other sister, Ida finds herself in the more mundane job of nanny. However the nanny role increases her desire to marry and raise children. The fact that her own wish for family will be a rocky path is predicted early on in two metaphorical incidents when Ida loses two of her beloved dolls, one left behind when the girls relocate to their grandmother and another destroyed by the girl’s mother when Ida has an argument with Nora. These incidents predict Ida’s fragile relationship with motherhood.

Like Ida in the novel Louise’s grandmother suffered the same medical condition which saw her unable to have healthy babies. Louise’s grandmother’s child, Louise’s uncle was stillborn. Louise with her medical knowledge was able to write clearly and sensitively on these traumatic situations.

While Ida struggles realising her family dreams, Nora leaves home to follow her musical one but things take an unexpected turn and Nora finds herself back home, a wife and mother, the very role her sister craves. Ida instead remains bitter at having her musical ambitions truncated. Ida fails to see all the things she should be thankful for, especially family, the very thing that evades her sister. Tragically she realises this too late. When Nora’s own daughter shows an inherited talent history seems like repeating itself.

Nora is aptly named for Ibsen’s housewife in The Dolls house. Louise tells me she didn’t consciously name her protagonist Nora but perhaps it was her subconscious at work and that the moniker certainly works well with the story.

‘The Sisters’ Song’ is out now published by Allen and Unwin.

Read more

0 comments

Black Inc. Books: New titles for April ...

Black Inc. Books
21.03.18 2:01 pm

image

We’re pleased to announce our forthcoming titles for April ...

Read here

Read more

0 comments

London Review of Books: Sharing the Best of British Expertise

London Review of Books
21.03.18 1:34 pm

Read here

Read more

0 comments

Hobart Bookshop, 5.30pm, April 4: Launch of The Big Rort ...

Hobart Bookshop
21.03.18 5:29 am

image

All about The Big Rort ...

Frank Cousins is a knock-about sort of a bloke.

He’s also the owner and sole employee of the Tasmanian Private Investigation Agency and, as his dear old mother said, ‘occasionally his own worst enemy’. That was until Frank meets Joe Shadii, aka ‘The Pharaoh’.

Frank is hired by a London based solicitor to find the twin sister of his client in Hobart. It starts out as an easy-peasy, money for jam case that turns nasty.

Then an ex-girlfriend, the lost love of his life, calls upon him to assist her brother who looks like going down for the brutal murder of his pregnant partner. And of course, Frank takes on the case.

But, as with most of Frank’s life, all is not what it first appears. Smuggled heroin, a handful of murders and coming to face with The Pharaoh was not what Frank had anticipated in trying to win back his lost love.

It’s all just as his dear old mother used to tell him, ‘sometimes, life’s just like that.’

The Big Rort is the second in the Tasmanian Private Investigation Agency series, the first, The Long Con being published in 2016.

• All about Barry Weston ...

Author Barry Weston moved to Bruny Island in 1999. Previously he was a Senior Lecturer within the School of Visual Arts of La Trobe University, Bendigo Campus. After a career in painting, printmaking and teaching, he started writing plays in 2002 for the Bruny Island Arts Inc. After four plays, all directed by his wife Megan and performed by a group of talented Bruny locals at the Adventure Bay Hall and the Peacock Theatre in Hobart, he turned his hand to a life-long passion: the murder/mystery genre.

His first book in The Tasmanian Private Investigation Agency trilogy, ‘The Long Con’ was published in 2016.

His second, ‘The Big Rort’, will be officially launched at The Hobart Book Shop in Salamanca on Wednesday, April 4th at 5.30pm. A second launch, specifically for Bruny Island residents, will take place at the Gatehouse, HIBA, 53 Adventure Bay Road, on Saturday 7th April, at 2.00pm.

The central character and anti-hero of this series is Frank Cousins, a corrupt Queensland police officer who resigned from the Force and moved to Hobart weeks prior to being called before the 1987 Royal Commission into QLD Police corruption. With false identification and limited work experience, Frank set up the Tasmanian Private Investigation Agency in Molle Street and, as owner and sole employee, commenced work. Unfortunately for our hero, in the grand scheme of things, he’s a bottom-feeder; plankton in the wading-pool of private detectives. Or, as his dear old departed Mum would say, ‘Oh son, dearest. Why do you always end up being you’re your own worst enemy?’

In ‘The Big Rort’, Frank is hired by a London based solicitor to find the twin sister of his client in Hobart. He immediately calls a sign-writer to add International to his Tasmanian Private Investigation Agency shingle. As far as he’s concerned, a missing person case is an easy-peasy, money-for-jam case. But of course, that’s when it all turns nasty. At the same time, an ex-girlfriend, the lost love of his life, calls upon him to assist her brother who looks like going down for the brutal murder of his pregnant partner. And of course, Frank takes on the case. But, as with most of Frank’s life, all is not what it first appears. Smuggled heroin, a handful of murders and coming to face with ‘The Pharaoh’ was not what Frank had anticipated in trying to win back his lost love. But then again, it’s all just as his dear old Mum used to tell him, ‘sometimes son, life’s just like that.’

To get a feel for both books, you can read the first two chapters of both books and decide if the genre is to your liking, and if not, hey! you’ve saved a few bucks. To down-load or read, go to: http://www.barryweston.com

Read more

0 comments

New York Review of Books: Lorca

New York Review of Books
20.03.18 6:33 am

Read here

Read more

0 comments

London Review of Books: Does anyone have the right to sex?

London Review of Books
16.03.18 9:26 am

Read here

Read more

0 comments

New York Review of Books: Ides of March

New York Review of Books
16.03.18 9:25 am

Read here

Read more

0 comments

Meetings with Remarkable Animals ... Paperback

Amazon
16.03.18 8:04 am

image

Meetings with Remarkable Animals is a collection of true stories.

Each one is unforgettable and all are magical.

Ordinary moments with extraordinary beings in their own habitat (with one very young exception who needed a home but brought his own nest with him).

Some of these beings are vast; some are tiny; All are sentient; none are human.

This is inter-species communion of the best kind with tips and ideas for respectful interactions with animals in the wild.

One is given a glimpse into the power of sound and its ability to create new pathways that have long been lost to most humans, so that consciousness can be shared beyond words - in ways and places that few of us would dream were possible.

“Jaiia’s book permanently changed my perspective in how I relate to other species. and it is so engagingly written.” KB “

Jaiia!: “I just had a great experience! I found a honeybee struggling on my floor. It looked like it was going to die, and it probably would have, but I gave it some honey, as you described in your book. It drank several times as it continued to struggle.

Then it walked a bit, and took flight. It flew off, and then it came back to me. It buzzed me for a couple of seconds, and then it was gone. Loved it!” Anon A portion of each sale will be donated to animal welfare groups”

Read more

0 comments

The Wichita of Oz

Paula Xiberras
16.03.18 5:34 am

image

Eugene Clark, professor and poet is a wizard of OZ

His story might have some parallels to the story of Dorothy and her visit to OZ but instead of like Dorothy, returning to his home of Kansas, due to a series of serendipitous events, Eugene decided to stay in OZ.

It’s a rainy afternoon in Sydney when I chat to Eugene .Our meeting is over the phone but it is a surreal experience as he suggests we chat in an alternative room unaffected by the sound of the falling rain. The rain particularly resonates with me on this day as Eugene recently informed me of the passing of a teaching colleague from his time at St Marys. I am reminded of Auden’s ‘distant thunder at a picnic’, being so reminded of poetry is apt as we are here to talk about Eugene’s passion for poetry.

A native of Wichita, Kansas, a place renowned for its trade is ironic as Eugene’s introduction to Australia and later Tasmania began with his trading his skills as a teacher. In 1975 the Australian government teacher recruitment program made a world-wide call out to mend the teacher shortage in Australia. Eugene was one of those who answered this call and began teaching at Keon Technical School in Victoria. Eugene was innovative in not only teaching conventional subjects but introducing public speaking and chess to the extra-curricular activities, Eugene’s students successfully competed on a quiz show ‘It’s Academic’ the only technical school to do so.

Taking some time off for relaxation, Eugene and his wife took a holiday in Tasmania, a place they immediately fell in love with however in 1977 the couple were required to return to the US for Eugene to complete his law degree (one of the five degrees he now holds) and then work for a time in legal aid.

It was another serendipitous moment that would see him return to Australia, this time it was the Catholic Education Office in Tasmania, in the person of Sister Gertrude Morgan the Principal of St Mary’s College that was reaching out for teaching staff. Sister Gertrude accepted Eugene’s application as he says ’sight unseen’. Later sister Gertrude said that it had been a higher power behind her decision.

At St Mary’s College Eugene taught Legal Studies, Australian History and English courses. Just as he did at Keon Technical School he introduced a program of public speaking and chess, and again, his tutelage was very successful with the school achieving championship status in public speaking.

Always eclectic, Eugene also co-authored a book on softball in this time as St Mary’s College. After leaving St Mary’s College Eugene continued his academic career eventually re-locating to Sydney.

Eugene tells me he has also created over 100 technical journal articles and has made time to indulge in his love of poetry which led him to the realisation that poetry has a spirit of imagination that prose writing lacks.

In an article ‘poetry still has its place in the 21st century’ Eugene argues that poetry is   alchemic process and ‘that it contains an ancient wisdom that helps resolve today problems and challenges’.

His article notes that Linguists suggest the first words we spoke were in poetry coming as they did from the formative section of our brain. It was this language of poetry that provided the vehicle for passing on cultural knowledge to successive generations. It is recognised that rhyme aids memory, hence it’s use in passing on knowledge. It’s aiding of memory means it is can also be employed in maintaining brain development and retention of memory for older people. Another kudo for poetry is that Celtic belief believed the important role of teacher was equivalent status to that poet.

Most importantly says Eugene, puts us in touch with our emotions in a way no other method of communication can.

In Eugene’s poem ‘21st Century Children of Narcissus’ Eugene muses on the digital generation, narcissism rather than altruism and the lack of genuine communication between people

A global cold spreading among millions of ‘Facebook’

Fans while true friends, genuine soulmates, are

Joining the list of endangered species.

Read more

0 comments

Black Power, Lyndon Johnson, the Beatles

New York Review of Books
14.03.18 12:16 pm

Read here

Read more

0 comments

Carter’s Corriedales, Clans and Kin

Paula Xiberras
13.03.18 5:22 am

image

Corriedale sheep are very common in Tasmania, Jane Carter on the other hand tells me she has been much rarer in her visits here, however she does farm corriedales!

I was talking to Jane about her novel Prodigal Daughter when she pointed out another Tasmanian connection in addition to Corriedales.Her other connection to Tasmania relates to Jill Muir of famous fishery Muirs. Many years ago Jill was on the mainland cray fishing and met up with Jane, who was pregnant at the time. Jill allieviated Jane’s fears of all things birth and baby by showing her a puppy birth.

Now that child, and Jane’s other children have visited Tasmania and shared their tales of bush, national parks and mountains with Jane. Talking of family it was Jane’s journalist father that may have destined her to be an author.

Janes book ‘Prodigal Daughter’ is the story of Diana who left the family farm as a young women to pursue an artistic career. When her husband passes away she returns home and is welcomed as the prodigal daughter of the title much to her sister Rosie’s chagrin, especially because Rosie has supported her parents on the farm over the years in the hope that once they retire she and her husband will gain the farm.

The novel is about family dysfunctions that drive families apart but also family losses that bring them together. Diane and her children are missing their husband and father while the former losses of Diane’s sister Cody as a child and friend Patrick’s loss of his young daughter leaves feelings of guilt that need to be surmounted before characters can move on.

Another theme of the novel is something not commonly known. The history of women on the land, that women have contributed as the backbone to the land since 1788.

Jane has been infiltrated with requests to write a sequel to the novel, something she is not sure about but responds with the quote ‘the end is a beginning’ and for now the reader can continue the story as they wish.

Prodigal Daughter is out now published by Harlequin.

Read more

0 comments

NYRB: Hearing Poland’s ghosts

New York Review of Books
09.03.18 5:19 am

Read here

Read more

0 comments

LRB: Stop binge-watching, start binge-reading!

London Review of Books
09.03.18 5:12 am

image

Read here

Read more

0 comments